Tag Archives: momotaro

Song list for Momotarō jazz opera

15 Jun

opening credit

:00      ojīsan goes out walking: Charlie Parker, “Now’s the Time”

:24      obasan washes clothes in river: Kenny Dorham, “Lotus Blossom”

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2OL7_4Mmt8)

:48      look, a peach approaches: Miles Davis, “Milestones”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BeZomqLM7BQ

1:40    ojī and obā break open peach: Thelonius Monk, “Misterioso”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yb5G3cHObXo

1:48    Momotarō bursts out: Monk, “Blue Monk”

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SmhP1RgbrrY)

2:02    ojī marvels: Horace Silver, “Sister Sadie”

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXGzt1BsH3U)

…some years later

2:20    Momotarō makes his plea to voyage: Bill Evans, “Waltz for Debby”       (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dH3GSrCmzC8)

3:38    Art Blakey, from the soundtack to Dangerous Liaisons (1958)

4:27    Momotarō sets out: Art Blakey, “Blues March”

4:57    sendoff for Momotarō: Sonny Rollins, “Doxy”

5:11    on the road, 3 animals: “Five Spots After Dark,” feat. Benny Golson (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BlHRPXPx-4)

5:50    animal alliance: Bud Powell Trio, “Cleopatra’s Dream” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KzzD09DnvZ0)

6:27    Momotarō subdues the animals: Herbie Mann, “Comin’ Home Baby” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJEjFh2FOzA)

7:00    ahoy, M hits the high seas: Herbie Hancock, “Maiden Voyage” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSj4oLRbQhg)

7:32    devils on Onigashima: Charlie Parker, “Donna Lee”–Saitō Haruhiko sings here

8:15 more devils assemble: Clifford Brown, “Cherokee” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Y6U0TD3z34)

8:43    pacification: Charles Mingus, “Fables of Faubus”

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1q9TISo1aw)

9:02    victory!: Miles Davis,  “Round Midnight”

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwFrxKhp8a8)

9:13    celebration!: John Coltrane, “Moment’s Notice”

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gocGlRuW1bw)

9:47    ensemble: Sonny Rollins, “St Thomas” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4DTR0I7xhA)

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Info for citation of Momotarō animated film

1 Nov

Source: zakkafilms.com

Attached is the pamphlet from the DVD anthology in which “Momotarō’s Sea Eagle” was released. It tells the director and year. The collection itself, The Roots of Japanese Anime until the End of WWII, was released by Zakka Films in 2009.

I haven’t found THIS Momotarō on grey market video channels, but you might…The later full-length film, Momotarō’s Divine Sea Warriors, is available several places, including here. The DVD is a Leavey on 4H reserve, with the call number LVYDVD 3291.

If you are writing on the animé, I do strongly advise looking at it again (it is only 37 min). This will help you to attend to the details and specific formal elements of the film, and thus strengthen your analysis of the narrative. I also have copies for loan–email me directly.

14_momotaro_pamphlet

The Power of Reese’s Puffs

19 Oct

I am sure many of us have seen the Reese’s Puffs commercial in which the cereal is presented as the gateway to good fortune. As soon as the boy puts one spoonful in his mouth, his life becomes infinitely better. His parents suddenly treat him as their master and allow him to do anything that his heart desires. After just one bite, he becomes extremely popular and catches the eye of a famous music group. Not only does this advertisement portray Reese’s Puffs cereal as something absolutely fantastic, but it also brainwashes young children to believe that they too can make their dreams come true after eating some. The boy’s sister seems to carry on with her drab life, probably due to the fact that she herself has not yet had a bite of the wondrous cereal. This definitely underscores the fact that it is indeed the Reese’s Puffs that have forever changed his fate. However, the real propaganda tool is the sister, who desperately tries to get her hands on the cereal box. She represents all the young children who are also dying to try just one bite of Reese’s Puffs. By observing her, they truly believe that the cereal is the key component to success.

Similarly, after becoming familiar with Momotaro’s myth, it is rather likely that millet dumplings became extremely popular in Japan because they were associated with effortless victory. People truly believed that if they too were to consume these “magical” dumplings, they would be guaranteed lifelong success in anything they tried to conquer. Almost everyone loves to eat food–what better way is there to distribute the message of Japanese nationalism through patriotic millet dumplings?

 

Warning: Mythical Foods May Contain Traces of Empowering Elements

19 Oct

Food has often been used by writers (and others) to hold a certain empowering element in myths. In Momotaro’s story, the mythical food is the millet dumpling. This food enables Momotaro and his companions to take over an island that is full of ogres. The food also serves as the element that unites the heroes and gives them the strength they need to defeat the oni.

Ever since I was a little boy, I was always extremely interested in Greek mythology. This same use of a mythical food as was in Momotaro’s story can be seen there, as well. One example of this is ambrosia. This meal was given to the gods living in Mount Olympus by doves. Ambrosia, in Greek mythology, is quite prevalent. It has been used by Aphrodite in the form of eau de ambrosia to grant her more seductiveness. In addition to this, it is frequently used by other gods and goddesses to not only fully satisfy one’s hunger, but also to confer a sort of grace and immortality.

Both ambrosia and the millet dumplings are mythical foods that serve as devices for different things. The dumplings stand for unity and strength, and the ambrosia stands for immortality and satiety. Food is often used to convey different things in writing, and food in a mythical sense is even more prevalent. I used to think that eating ambrosia (which is delicious, by the way) conferred some sort of special feelings of strength, and I am fairly confident if I were aware of Momotaro’s story and millet dumplings from a younger age, they would also have somewhat of a similar effect.

Class prep for October 14–Thursday

12 Oct

We will watch the Momotarō film in class. As you watch, and as you read, think about:

?: what elements seem to vary, between versions? What elements are a constant–and seem to resemble a structure, something fixed?

?: like Ryuji, Momotarō is a young peach. How do the qualities people usually look for in a child help him in his cause as a warrior?

Note: the NDL (national diet library) book is much better when viewed on line here.

Don’t forget to watch the Momotarō jazz opera [search for Momotarō in the blog search box]

No blog entry–blog entry is due on a “mythic or propagandistic food” on Tuesday, October 19.

Momotarō jazz opera

20 Aug

This video goes with the class for Tuesday, October 12, on Momotarō, the child-hero of a famous folktale, otherwise known as the peach boy.

It’s a performance from a March 1986 TV program called What a Great Night, hosted by the comedian Tamori.

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Momotarō jazz opera song list

 

opening credit

:00      ojīsan goes out walking: Charlie Parker, “Now’s the Time”

:24      obasan washes clothes in river: Kenny Dorham, “Lotus Blossom”

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2OL7_4Mmt8)

:48      look, a peach approaches: Miles Davis, “Milestones”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BeZomqLM7BQ

1:40    ojī and obā break open peach: Thelonius Monk, “Misterioso”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yb5G3cHObXo

1:48    Momotarō bursts out: Monk, “Blue Monk”

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SmhP1RgbrrY)

2:02    ojī marvels: Horace Silver, “Sister Sadie”

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXGzt1BsH3U)

…some years later

2:20    Momotarō makes his plea to voyage: Bill Evans, “Waltz for Debby”       (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dH3GSrCmzC8)

3:38    Art Blakey, from the soundtack to Dangerous Liaisons (1958)

4:27    Momotarō sets out: Art Blakey, “Blues March”

4:57    sendoff for Momotarō: Sonny Rollins, “Doxy”

5:11    on the road, 3 animals: “Five Spots After Dark,” feat. Benny Golson (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BlHRPXPx-4)

5:50    animal alliance: Bud Powell Trio, “Cleopatra’s Dream” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KzzD09DnvZ0)

6:27    Momotarō subdues the animals: Herbie Mann, “Comin’ Home Baby” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJEjFh2FOzA)

7:00    ahoy, M hits the high seas: Herbie Hancock, “Maiden Voyage” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSj4oLRbQhg)

7:32    devils on Onigashima: Charlie Parker, “Donna Lee”–Saitō Haruhiko sings here

8:15 more devils assemble: Clifford Brown, “Cherokee” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Y6U0TD3z34)

8:43    pacification: Charles Mingus, “Fables of Faubus”

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1q9TISo1aw)

9:02    victory!: Miles Davis,  “Round Midnight”

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwFrxKhp8a8)

9:13    celebration!: John Coltrane, “Moment’s Notice”

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gocGlRuW1bw)

9:47    ensemble: Sonny Rollins, “St Thomas” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4DTR0I7xhA)

 

 

 

 

 

Source: troutfactorynotebook